April 27th 2014

Filmwise: more editing and collating of notes for new drafts.
“Many medals!”
Hopping on the train towards Central London on Saturday morning, I found myself standing opposite an elderly gentleman at the end of the crowded carriage. Someone stood up offering him a seat, but he motioned to his wife to sit down.
I helped him move the small suitcase she had by her side.
Thanking me, he whispered in his shaky voice,”we’re going on holiday.”
To my query, he replied, “somewhere in the country… Away from all the noise.”
In an attempt to reassure his spouse that all was well, talking as he was to this random stranger, he smiled to her and confided in me, “we’ve been married for 54 years! She’s from Argentina.”
“How did you meet her?”
“Through my sport.”
It transpired that this tall and gentle octogenarian is a former European rowing champion.
“I have many medals, but we didn’t make it to the Olympics. We lost at the final of the trials.”
He only stopped rowing because of the walk from the boat to the river bank. “You see, the Thames’ water level is determined by the sea. So, when the tide is out, it’s hard for me to walk back to the river bank.”
I was a tad disappointed that I reached my stop so soon; would’ve spent hours listening to him talk about London, rowing and the colours of the different river clubs.
At the O2, I attended a panel discussion.
Ryan Coogler shared the gem that I took with me from a panel discussion about story and film. The director of the moving and harrowing Fruitvale Station (2013), eloquently explained the difference between making shorts and features:
“You’re never ready to shoot your first feature . It’s like the bird being pushed out of the nest; you either fly or hit the ground and never make another film. Also, it’s about the stamina. When I was at film school, we shot our shorts over weekends. So, when you get on your first feature, you realise how much stamina you need to go through the shoot of weeks of filming.”
Yes, you tell ‘em brother; couldn’t agree more.
Peace and love,
Ja’far
Filmwise: more editing and collating of notes for new drafts.
“Many medals!”
Hopping on the train towards Central London on Saturday morning, I found myself standing opposite an elderly gentleman at the end of the crowded carriage. Someone stood up offering him a seat, but he motioned to his wife to sit down.
I helped him move the small suitcase she had by her side.
Thanking me, he whispered in his shaky voice,”we’re going on holiday.”
To my query, he replied, “somewhere in the country… Away from all the noise.”
In an attempt to reassure his spouse that all was well, talking as he was to this random stranger, he smiled to her and confided in me, “we’ve been married for 54 years! She’s from Argentina.”
“How did you meet her?”
“Through my sport.”
It transpired that this tall and gentle octogenarian is a former European rowing champion.
“I have many medals, but we didn’t make it to the Olympics. We lost at the final of the trials.”
He only stopped rowing because of the walk from the boat to the river bank. “You see, the Thames’ water level is determined by the sea. So, when the tide is out, it’s hard for me to walk back.”
I was a tad disappointed that I reached my stop so soon; would’ve gladly spent hours listening to him talk about London, rowing and the colours of the different river clubs.
At the journey’s end, I attended a panel discussion.
Ryan Coogler shared the gem that I took with me from this panel about story and film. The director of the moving and harrowing Fruitvale Station (2013) eloquently explained the difference between making shorts and features:
“You’re never ready to shoot your first feature . It’s like the bird being pushed out of the nest; you either fly or hit the ground and never make another film. Also, it’s about stamina. When I was at film school, we shot our shorts over weekends. So, when you get to your first feature, you realise how much stamina you need to go through the shoot of weeks of filming.”
Yes, you tell ‘em brother; couldn’t agree more.
Peace and love,
Ja’far

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